Heidegger's Bible Handbook: NT Apocrypha: Jesuit Commendation

2. That some of these are defended by modern Jesuits, Casaubon marvels for good reason.

Petrus Canisius

Now, with good reason does the most learned Casaubon marvel, Exercitationibus XIII, Section 31, that the authority of the Roman Council, and of Pope Gelasius, is so despised today, and is considered as nothing by those to whom the individual words of much later Popes, of a certain Hildebrand,[1] or Boniface VIII,[2] or Alexander VI,[3] are so many Divine Oracles. For who, says he, does not known that today many books false and full of fables are defended by Francisco Turrianus,[4] Petrus Canisius,[5] and Christophorus de Castro,[6] Jesuits of no small reputation, and also by many others, which books were rejected by Pope Gelasius? Which he writes upon occasion of the Epistle of Jesus to Abgar, and of Abgar to Jesus, which, placed by Gelasius among the Apocryphal writings, Baronius on the year 31 AD, number 58, describes, and commends as worthy of confidence, and not proscribed by the Church.

[1] This is likely a reference to Gregory VII (reigned as Pope from 1073 to 1085), who restricted to title of Pope to the Roman Bishop, and did much to advance the claims of the Papacy against civil rulers. [2] Boniface VIII (reigned as Pope from 1294 to 1303) advanced the claims of Papal Supremacy to a new historical level. [3] Alexander VI (reigned as Pope from 1492 to 1503) made bold to divide the extra-European world between Spain and Portugal. [4] Franciscus Turrianus (c. 1509-1584) was a Spanish Jesuit theologian. He served as a professor at the Roman College, was present at the Council of Trent, and took part in the revision of the Sixtine Vulgate. Turrianus defended the doctines of the Immaculate Conception and the authority of Popes over Councils. [5] Petrus Canisius (1521-1597) was a Dutch Jesuit priest and scholar. Through his preaching and writing, he proved to be a powerful opponent of the Reformation. [6] Christophorus de Castro (1551-1615) was a Spanish Jesuit scholar.

30 views1 comment