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Heidegger's Bible Handbook: New Testament in General: Use and Abuse of Chapter and Verse Divisions

Updated: Mar 26, 2020

10. Its use and abuse is laid open in the words of Gomar and Casaubon.


Franciscus Gomar

This is the use of this history, that is, of the division of sections, chapters, and verses (in the words of the Most Celebrated Gomar on 1 Peter 1, if it may be permitted), let us not attribute Divine authority to these divisions of chapters or verses, nor accuse those of temerity that occasionally find fault with those divisions, or change them with just reason or caution. For, somethings those things that are conjoined by the matter itself are ineptly divided with injury to the sense, and vice versa; of which matter many examples, if it be needful, could be produced, and concerning this matter repeated complaints are extant in the commentaries of that Most Learned Man, John Calvin. It is helpful to add concerning this matter the judgment of Isaac Casaubon.[1] Now, he speaks thus: Even if I do not disapprove of the division of the sacred books received today: nevertheless, I do not doubt that the division of the ancients would be far more suitable, if some great Theologian had given his attention to correcting it. For, the ancients were dividing the individual books into τίτλους/titles/headings, and the individual τίτλουςinto their κεφάλαια/ chapters, so that that division might be able more to help the Lector/Reader. For not, I suppose, as we see done today in many passages, were they dividing those things that, if one should attend more diligently, ought rather to be read conjointly, but they were rather in this way distinguishing diverse questions, and the parts of the same question: how greatly this is to be valued, no one that will have diligently read, especially the most intricately crafted Epistles of Paul, is able to be ignorant.


[1]Isaac Casaubon (1559-1614) began his career as Professor of Greek at Geneva and finished his career as a prebendary of Westminster and Canterbury. He was a learned critic, and produced annotated editions of Greek and Latin authors. Casaubon was among those that sought a reunion between the Protestant and Roman churches.


Dr. Dilday's Lecture: "New Testament Textual Criticism, Part 2"



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ronfrancis
ronfrancis
Apr 07, 2020

Looking forward to the conclusion of this lesson. Hoping everyone is keeping well.

I can confirm that the documentary series mention has these 3 parts the earliest of which came out in 2009. I’ve watch them all and they are currently on Amazon Prime. If one has never studied these aspects of the history of the church and the Bible, they are informative. Don’t expect the highest level of production and they have some repetition. I will say they are controversial, and one’s own research should be done on the points made. I found the last one, a bit better in overall quality, and might be enough to watch to get a handle on the translation issues.

A LAMP IN…


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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
Feb 15, 2020

Although the chapter and verse divisions are very helpful in locating passages, when it comes to interpretation, it must be remembered that they are not inspired, but of human invention.

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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
Feb 15, 2020

On February 4, we will be beginning a New Testament Survey study course (class page: https://www.fromreformationtoreformation.com/new-testament-survey), considering the glorious fulfillment of all of the ancient Old Testament promises in our Jesus!


This NT Survey will be composed of two components:


1. A course of readings in Johann Heinrich Heidegger's Handbook of the New Testament. Heidegger will provide for us an introductory survey for each New Testament book. The Readings will be organized on the class page.


2. Weekly lectures. Join us live and online on Tuesdays (7pm EST), beginning February 4. [https://www.gotomeet.me/fromreftoref]


If you are interested in this course, please contact Dr. Dilday at dildaysc@aol.com to get added to the email list.

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