Heidegger's Bible Handbook: Colossians: Argument of the Epistle

3. The Argument of the Epistle.


Thus Saint Paul, who, as long as he was living on earth, labored to bring forth the Church of Christ and believers, until Christ was formed in them; and he, when bound in chains, by no means put off the care of believers, who needed to be confirmed in the acknowledged faith; he earnestly congratulates the Colossians on their undertaking faith in Christ, goads them to seek the increase of it, commends the benefits of Christ, dissuades from vain wisdom, superstition, the Mosaic rites, and παραλογισμὸν, fallacious reasoning,[1] and finally prescribes the exercises of true faith and piety. Therefore, although succinct in words, yet it contains the nucleus of the entire Gospel, and overthrows all human fantasies, and worship contrived beside and contrary to the word of God.

[1] Colossians 2:4: “And this I say, lest any man should beguile (παραλογίζηται) you with enticing words.”

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