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Poole on Revelation 3:19: Zeal

Verse 19:[1] (Job 5:17; Prov. 3:11, 12; Heb. 12:5, 6; Jam. 1:12) As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.



[Whom I love (as friends, sons, and my future heirs [Tirinus]: Whom I have resolved not to cast away completely on account of abiding sins, but to endure: For here φιλῶ, I love, is used, not absolutely, but comparatively, as μισεῖν, to hate, elsewhere: See 2 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 6:11 [Grotius]: understand, those [Camerarius]) I charge and chasten[2]] I reprehend with words; I chasten with lashes (Grotius, similarly Cluverus, Durham, Ribera). Thus you have the verb ἐλέγχειν in John 8:46[3] and 1 Timothy 5:20.[4] But, παιδεύειν in 1 Corinthians 11:32;[5] 1 Timothy 1:20;[6] Hebrews 12:7[7] (Grotius). The words are taken out of Proverbs 3:12[8] (Grotius, thus Drusius). Lest He should increase their wretchedness with desperation, He raises them unto the hope of salvation, and teaches that this sharp rebuke is a proof of His love (Cotterius): that is to say, Receive these admonitions as proofs of a loving heart, as they actually are (Menochius, similarly Cluverus, Gomar, Durham, Pareus). Others: The sense: These persecutions and calamities (which cause thee to doubt of the promises of Christ, and render thee torpid) are pledges of my love, by which I exercise the elect, so that they, purer and better, might pass through (Ribera).


I rebuke and chasten; ἐλέγχω καὶ παιδεύω: the words may be translated, I convince and instruct, or deal with them as children; but it also signifies to chasten, and is so translated, 1 Corinthians 11:32; Hebrews 12:7; we translate it learn, 1 Timothy 1:20. By these words Christ lets this angel know, that although he had in this epistle dealt smartly with him, yet he had done it from a principle of love, as a father to a child, Hebrews 12:7.


[Be zealous, etc., ζήλωσον, etc.] Understand, ἐμέ, for me (Beza). This verb sometimes has an Accusative of the thing for which we are zealous, as in 1 Corinthians 12:31;[9] 14:1;[10] Galatians 4:17;[11] it is sometimes set down intransitively, as here, and in Numbers 11:29;[12] 1 Kings 19:14;[13] 1 Corinthians 13:4[14] (Ribera). [Thus they translate it:] Be fervent (or, grow hot [Grotius], understand, with zeal for me [Beza]; or, be zealous [Vulgate], love ardently [Piscator, thus Menochius], be inflamed with zeal [Tirinus, thus Ribera] against all lukewarmness and torpor, whether thine own, or of those belonging to thee, chasing those things far off [Tirinus]; zeal for thy salvation [Menochius, thus Ribera], and that of others, take up [Menochius]: Ardent love is called ζῆλος/ zeal, קִנְאָה, in Numbers 11:29; Psalm 69:9;[15] and elsewhere: Some manuscripts read ζήλευε[16] [Grotius]: By this verb He prescribes a laudable ambition for piety and virtue, and ardent affection in the observance of religion [Camerarius]) therefore (O thou lukewarm [Grotius]), and repent (Piscator, etc.). From thy former lukewarmness and hypocrisy (Cluverus), so that thou mightest avoid threatening evils (Ribera). From love for me reform thy life. You see here the reciprocal actions of Christ and Men concerning conversion (Grotius).


Be zealous therefore, and repent; he adviseth him therefore to quit himself of his lukewarmness, and to recover a warmth and zeal for God, repenting of his former coldness and negligence in his duty.

[1] Greek: ἐγὼ ὅσους ἐὰν φιλῶ, ἐλέγχω καὶ παιδεύω· ζήλωσον οὖν καὶ μετανόησον. [2] Revelation 3:19: “As many as I love, I rebuke (ἐλέγχω) and chasten (παιδεύω): be zealous therefore, and repent.” [3] John 8:46a: “Which of you convinceth (ἐλέγχει) me of sin?…” [4] 1 Timothy 5:20: “Them that sin rebuke (ἔλεγχε) before all, that others also may fear.” [5] 1 Corinthians 11:32: “But when we are judged, we are chastened (παιδευόμεθα) of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world.” [6] 1 Timothy 1:20: “Of whom is Hymenaeus and Alexander; whom I have delivered unto Satan, that they may learn (παιδευθῶσι) not to blaspheme.” [7] Hebrews 12:7: “If ye endure chastening (παιδείαν), God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth (παιδεύει) not?” [8] Proverbs 3:11, 12: “My son, despise not the chastening (παιδείας, in the Septuagint) of the Lord; neither be weary of his correction (ἐλεγχόμενος, when rebuked, in the Septuagint): For whom the Lord loveth he correcteth (παιδεύει/chasteneth, in the Septuagint); even as a father the son in whom he delighteth.” [9] 1 Corinthians 12:31a: “But covet earnestly the best gifts (ζηλοῦτε δὲ τὰ χαρίσματα τὰ κρείττονα)…” [10] 1 Corinthians 14:1: “Follow after charity, and desire spiritual gifts (ζηλοῦτε δὲ τὰ πνευματικά), but rather that ye may prophesy.” [11] Galatians 4:17: “They are zealous for you (ζηλοῦσιν ὑμᾶς), but not well; yea, they would exclude you, that ye might be zealous for them (ἵνα αὐτοὺς ζηλοῦτε).” [12] Numbers 11:29a: “And Moses said unto him, Enviest thou for my sakeהַֽמְקַנֵּ֥א אַתָּ֖ה) לִ֑י, with the ל serving as the indirect object marker; ζηλοῖς σύ μοι, in the Septuagint)?… [13] 1 Kings 19:14a: “And he said, I have been very jealous for the Lordקַנֹּ֙א קִנֵּ֜אתִי) לַיהוָ֣ה׀, with the ל serving as the indirect object marker; ζηλῶν ἐζήλωκα τῷ κυρίῳ, in the Septuagint) God of hosts…” [14] 1 Corinthians 13:4a: “Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth (ζηλοῖ) not…” [15] Psalm 69:9a: “For the zeal (קִנְאַת) of thine house hath eaten me up…” [16] Codices Alexandrinus and Ephræmi Rescriptus, and some Byzantine manuscripts, read ζήλευε, the singular, present, imperative form of ζηλεύω. The Textus Receptus and other Byzantine manuscripts read ζήλωσον, the singular, aorist, imperative form of ζηλόω. The meaning is not much affected.

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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
11 de jul. de 2020

Octavius Winslow's Evening Thoughts: '"Unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake."—Philippians 1:29


Such is the nature of Christ's religion, and such the terms of His discipleship—suffering and self-denial. This is a truth hard to understand for those who are not initiated into the mysteries of the kingdom of grace. To them it is inexplicable how one who is loved by God, whose sins Christ has forgiven, whose life appears holy, useful, and honored, could be the subject of divine correction and, perhaps in some instances more than others, seem smitten by God and afflicted. But to those who are students of Christ, who learn…


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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
11 de jul. de 2020


Jonathan Edwards' Freedom of the Will: 'Dr. Taylor urges, that the afflictions to which mankind are subjected, and particularly their common mortality, are represented in Scripture as the chastisements of our heavenly Father; and therefore are designed for our spiritual good, and consequently are not of the nature of punishments. (So in p. 68-69. 38-39. S.)


Though I think the thing asserted far from being true, viz. that the Scripture represents the afflictions of mankind in general, and particularly their common mortality, as the chastisement of a heavenly Father; yet it is needless to stand to dispute that matter. For if it be so, it will be no argument that the afflictions and death of mankind are not evidences of…

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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
11 de jul. de 2020


Spurgeon's Morning and Evening: '"Be zealous."—Revelation 3:19


If you would see souls converted, if you would hear the cry that "the kingdoms of this world have become the kingdoms of our Lord;" if you would place crowns upon the head of the Saviour, and his throne lifted high, then be filled with zeal. For, under God, the way of the world's conversion must be by the zeal of the church. Every grace shall do exploits, but this shall be first; prudence, knowledge, patience, and courage will follow in their places, but zeal must lead the van. It is not the extent of your knowledge, though that is useful; it is not the extent of your talent, though that is not…

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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
11 de jul. de 2020


William Tong (for Matthew Henry): 'Here is added great and gracious encouragement to this sinful people to take the admonition and advice well that Christ had given them, Revelation 3:19-20. He tells them...It was given them in true and tender affection: "Whom I love, I rebuke and chasten. You may think I have given you hard words and severe reproofs; it is all out of love to your souls. I would not have thus openly rebuked and corrected your sinful lukewarmness and vain confidence, if I had not been a lover of your souls; had I hated you, I would have let you alone, to go on in sin till it had been your ruin." Sinners ought to take th…

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Dr. Dilday
Dr. Dilday
10 de jul. de 2020

Dr. Dilday's Sermon: "Be Zealous"

https://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=110112340245

1) Introduction

2) Analysis

a) Context

b) Verse 19

i) “As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten”

ii) “Be zealous therefore, and repent”

3) Doctrine: Christ the King corrects His erring subjects.

a) Statement of doctrine

WLC 45: How doth Christ execute the office of a king? Christ executeth the office of a king, in calling out of the world a people to himself, and giving them officers, laws, and censures, by which he visibly governs them; in bestowing saving grace upon his elect, rewarding their obedience, and correcting them for their sins, preserving and supporting them under all their temptations and sufferings, restraining and overcoming all their enemies, and powerfully ordering…

Curtir
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