Heidegger's Bible Handbook: Acts: Subject Matter

Updated: Jan 22

2. The acts of the Holy Apostles, especially of Peter and Paul, of whom Luke was a follower, are contained in this book.



They are called the Acts of the Holy Apostles. But especially of Peter and Paul, whom Luke, the writer of the book, is thought chiefly to have followed. Yet some sparing mention of Saint John, Acts 3, and of James, Acts 1; 12, occurs; but there is no express mention of the others in this book. That is, after the dispersion of the Apostles Luke did not have the particular acts of the individual Apostles as verified, neither was he able to know them without extraordinary revelation of the Holy Spirit. There are still some things that concern all the Apostles. For example, their common doctrine, the election of Matthias into the place of Judas through their common prayers,[1] common signs and miracles, and, finally, a Synod attended by all.[2] So that they are with good reason called the Acts of all the Holy Apostles.

[1] See Acts 1:13-26. [2] See Acts 15.


Dr. Dilday's Lecture: "The Acts of the Apostles, Part 1"



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Dr. Steven Dilday holds a BA in Religion and Philosophy from Campbell University, a Master of Arts in Religion from Westminster Theological Seminary (Philadelphia), and both a Master of Divinity and a  Ph.D. in Puritan History and Literature from Whitefield Theological Seminary.  He is also the translator of Matthew Poole's Synopsis of Biblical Interpreters and Bernardinus De Moor’s Didactico-Elenctic Theology.

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